Human Resistin for the Treatment of Sepsis

Prof. Meera Nair and her colleagues at UCR have discovered that human resistin may be used as a therapy to treat sepsis. Using a transgenic mouse model expressing human resistin, researchers showed that mice expressing resistin had a 80-100% rate of survival from a sepsis-like infection when compared to wildtype mice with the same infection. The researchers also found that human resistin decreased the number of pro-inflammatory and Th1 cytokines. Through immunoprecipitation assays, human resistin was found to bind to TLR-4 thus blocking the TLR-4 signaling in immune and inflammatory cells. Fig. 1 shows the survival curves for four different mouse models exposed to a sepsis like infection. The red line represents wild type C57BL/6 mice and none of these mice survived the infection. The black line is the background mouse model without the transgene incorporated into its genome. The Tg+ and Tg2+ are two different transgenic mouse models expressing human resistin. Fig. 2 shows that structural modeling predicts that resistin (green/blue) binds TLR4 (red) and blocks binding LPS co-receptor MD2 (grey) Grace Yee grace.yee@ucr.edu 951-827-2212

Related Blog

Smart, interactive desk

Get ready to take your space management game to the next level with the University of Glasgow’s innovative project! By combining the

Mechanical Hamstring™

University of Delaware Technology Overview This device was created to allow athletes who suffer a hamstring strain to return to the field

Join Our Newsletter

                                                   Receive Innovation Updates, New Listing Highlights And More