Nanotech Cell-Based Coatings for Medical Devices

Northeastern University Background
Orthopedic implants have the highest infection rate for implantable medical devices. Coating technologies currently on the market have adverse side effects such as reduced biocompatibility and tissue regeneration, while coatings that favor tissue regeneration actually increase the rate of infections. This has led to patient dissatisfaction, economic burden, and the need for follow-up revision procedures. There remains an unmet need for innovative technology that can reduce the rate of infections associated with implantable medical devices, while also promoting tissue regeneration in the patient. This would not only improve post-surgery outcomes for patients but would also help to address the $100 billion+ market for implantable medical devices. 
Technology Overview
Novaurum Biosciences has developed a human cell and nanoparticle-based coating platform for implantable biomedical devices called AuPEC – Augmented Protection and Enhancement Coating. The cells form a coating layer that is then induced to produce nanoparticles. The cell-nanoparticle mixture glues onto the device and forms a protective coating, preventing bacterial infections and triggering tissue regeneration. The coating also extends the implant’s life by preventing corrosion and degradation. The ability to customize the coating based on the host tissue increases the range for its application. 
Benefits

Reduces infection rates 
Promotes faster tissue regeneration and prevents microbial biofilm formation 
Corrosion and degradation resistant coating 
Prevents release of debris 
Customizable based on host tissue cell line 
Easy to apply 
Cost-effective 
Non-toxic 
Non-disruptive

Applications

Orthopedic biomedical implant device coating 
Can be extended for applications in other implants 

Opportunity
Connecting with prospective investors, applying for grant funding

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